Why are Mining Software Key in Mining Projects

Why are Mining Software Key in Mining Projects

Mining software provides mining companies with fast, efficient, cost-effective tools in order to manage operations and mine design plans. With technology connecting the world together and making it easy for professionals to communicate their ideas, mining software companies are under constant pressure to develop new tools to meet the new industry standards. 

Some aspects are crucial to ensure the success of a mine. These aspects include visualization, modeling, design and planning, and database management. Mining software are therefore constantly providing tools to meet these aspects. In some cases, mining software companies will optimize each one of these aspects to fit the specific mine’s needs. The most popular mining software packages rely on database management, CAD functionality for the design aspect, and other functionalities to develop short- and long-term plans. 

An important factor that ranks a mining software is its capability of displaying 3D objects. As the mining industry is constantly promoting the safety of its employees and with the rise of technology, mining companies want a 3D visualization tool to extract more ore, decrease extracted stopes dilution, calculate accurate tonnages of stockpiles, and much more. 

Another important feature of why mining software is important to consider and to implement in a mining company is the use of algorithms. Using algorithms can help optimize stopes, model a block model with accurate grades and tonnages, perform geostatistics and much more. Essentially, calculations that could take days, weeks or months can be done in a few mins using a mining software. As the mining industry is a fast-paced work environment, professionals want a tool that is efficient and can provide accurate results. 

All these developments requirements and the needs of the mining industry give mining software companies the challenge to outperform and innovate to satisfy the industry. User-friendliness poses a huge factor as well. People don’t necessarily perceive the use of computers the same; so, having a user-friendly software is an essential step to meet the requirements of the mining industry. Also, mining professionals want a tool that’s easy to learn and use, and not waste many hours of training. Therefore, having a user-friendly software can be viewed as an integral part of any mining software. 

Providing users with tools that allow quick and accurate management of their overall mine is why mining software exist. An ideal mining software provides the necessary tools to help drive mining companies forward as efficiently as possible, listens to the mining industry feedback and develops its tools accordingly, and provides its users with a user-friendly interface. 

 

 Reference: 

Kapageridis. (2005, January). The Future of Mine Planning Software – New Tools and Innovations. Researchgate.Net. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/239555634_The_Future_of_Mine_Planning_Software_-_New_Tools_and_Innovations 

🎙Episode 7 | Mining Ventures in Colombia

🎙Episode 7 | Mining Ventures in Colombia

✅ The Mining Experience is a live podcast that invites professionals from the mining industry to discuss new technologies, address challenges, and share work experiences. Having one of the largest coal reserves in Latin America, Colombia hosts also a significant amount of nickel and gold. With direct investments from foreign countries, Colombia’s mining industry is expected to rise by 15%, giving it to the potential to attract larger investments. 

This episode has the honor to invite a very special guests: 

➡️ Juan David Gómez is Senior Trade Officer for Mining, Oil and Gas, and Responsible Business Conduct at the Canadian Embassy in Colombia, and his main job is to provide strategic support to Canadian companies and investors interested in doing business in Colombia. Previous to his role as Trade Commissioner, Juan worked as Government Affairs Coordinator for Colombia, Central America and the Latin Caribbean at Shell. Juan Has been working with Global Affairs Canada since September 2017.

➡️ Professor Oscar Jaime Restrepo Baena; professor in the Department of Materials and Minerals of the School of Mines at Universidad Nacional de Colombia and member of the Minerals Institute – CIMEX, where he participates in research projects and head of research in the area of Extractive Metallurgy. 

Professor Oscar obtained the degree of Mining and Metallurgy Engineer in the School of Mines at Universidad Nacional de Colombia and completed the MSc. in Environmental Impact Assessment and the Ph.D. in Metallurgy and Materials at the Universidad de Oviedo, Spain. He completed a post-doctoral stay in the R & D laboratory of the Nubiola Company in Barcelona, Spain, where he also served as director of Research and Development. 

In addition to being the author of numerous scientific and academic articles in the area of extractive metallurgy, sustainability in mining and ceramic materials, Professor Oscar Jaime is also the director of research projects developed with national and international funding and President of the Society of Mining Professors 2019-2021. 

Sustainability in Mining in Colombia

Sustainability in Mining in Colombia

 

The concept of sustainability can be accepted as the fact to utilize things in a way to maintain them so that future generations can enjoy them as well. When talking about mining, it is difficult to apply this concept to a large ore deposit. This is because the main goal it to extract the full orebody to recover minerals, which means that the orebody itself cannot be maintained for future generations. Therefore, when talking about sustainability in mining, we can think of it in a way to reduce environmental damages, energy that feeds processes on mine site, and other factors related to the impact of the surrounding environment. Human beings have been mining since the stone age, trying to produce valuable materials, tools and fertilizers to help them in their daily lives. In the past, little attention was given to the environmental impact caused by the production of these activities, leading to mercury and cyanide being discharged into the environment, for example. 

The current situation in Colombia’s mining industry is quite complex due to the instability of the economy and environmental regulatory issues. Consequently, it is difficult to clearly measure sustainability in mining in Colombia. Many areas, in Colombia’s mining regions, damage the environment and millions of hectares get devastated, which can in return could have been used for agriculture. Therefore, it is crucial to build environmental regulations capable of measuring and quantifying such activities. Perhaps, given the livelihood of people living in Colombia, it is difficult to make such a transition, where people tend to focus more on their financial and educational situation. 

Environmental and Social Assessment (ESA) is one example of how mines in Colombia can assess whether the mining project will be a high-impact project or a low-impact project. Given that Colombia is one of the biggest coal exporter, this is an opportunity to identify the main “pain points” which has the capability to prevent major environmental disasters. This assessment undergoes several stages to identify the impact. For example, in the beginning, an “ESA Screening” is performed, where experts determine the possible impact of the project in question based on previous experience from similar projects. Then, an “ESA Scoping” is done, where the biggest possible environmental impacts are identified. Lastly, the most important step is the “Environmental and Social Management Plan” (ESP), which aims to implement a set of prevention, mitigation, compensation, monitoring and institutional measures to be implemented throughout all phases of the mining project. 

Having a good mining sustainability foundation means that organization must be completely revamped. This will require a significant amount of organization to cope with the fast-paced work environment in the mining industry. This leads to the need of powerful software, able to flawlessly manage mining designs, plans and other information in one secure location that can be accessed easily by an organization. Promine addresses these needs through the Essential Category, which allows users to share up-to-date drawings using the Filer Module. In addition, this project management tool allows to connect to a local server, OneDrive or Google Drive and add unlimited users to your account for managing drawing-level permissions.This unvaluable toolkit allows organizations to easily manage their teams during the fast-moving recovery period of the mining industry. 

 

References: 

MOLINA ESCOBAR, JORGE MARTÍN, & RESTREPO BAENA, OSCAR JAIME (2010). COLOMBIAN MINING SUSTAINABILITY. Dyna, 77(161),149-151.[fecha de Consulta 4 de Agosto de 2021]. ISSN: 0012-7353. Disponible en:   https://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=49615347016 

Goodland, R. (2011, December). Best Practice Mining in ColombiaSpeech presented at Best Practice Mining forum. 

Episode 6 | Mining Ventures in Peru

Episode 6 | Mining Ventures in Peru

🎙 EPISODE VI | Mining Ventures in Peru

The Mining Experience is a live podcast that invites professionals from the mining industry to discuss new technologies, address challenges, and share work experiences. In this episode, we will have the opportunity to discuss with our guests the different factors that affect mining investment and their implications in the mining industry in Peru.

We have the honor to host two special guests:

✅ Frank Echegaray.
Mining engineer with more than 7 years of experience in open pit mines. Responsible for production rates of 400,000 ton/day as total and 120,000 ton/day of ore. He also has experience in the implementation of autonomous haulage system at Quellaveco mine by digitizing the mine structures in order to allow autonomous trucks work by the guidance of the command control crew and fulfill the production rates of pre striping of the mine.

✅ Juan David Rondinel.
Mining engineer from the National University of San Marcos in Peru, with solid experience in the fields of planning, mining operations, mining projects development, and mine expansion. He has a solid knowledge in mineral reserves estimation, mining design and planning, as well as the long, medium, and short-term mining plans design.

Overview of the mining industry in Peru

Overview of the mining industry in Peru

Peru ranks third in global copper production, second for silver and sixth for gold. Being one of the largest mining sectors worldwide, Peru faced unprecedented economic and social challenges due to COVID-19. In addition to the pandemic, Peru experienced more organizational issues due to politics, as the country saw many changes in the government. However, in the face of adversity, Peru has so much hope to bounce back as its mining industry accounts for 60% of the country’s exports.  

According to MINEM, a total mining investment in December alone reached a total of 664 US$ million, which offers a great opportunity for recovery and to see changes done quicker than ever. Out of many countries, Peru was the first to halt its mining operations after the first COVID-19 wave but then was able to create an almost perfect balance during the second wave. This allowed the country to give Companies the chance to run their operations while making sure health and safety are respected. According to the IMF, Peru is expected to experience 9% of growth in 2021, which is considered the fastest and strongest recovery in Latin America in that year. Currently, junior mining companies are advancing exploration under more favorable market conditions, and multiple large-scale projects remain undeveloped, which offers a great opportunity for more mining investments.  

As Peru ranks third in copper production, the opportunity for copper export is substantial. As Countries are moving towards a more sustainable future, the need for electric vehicles is increasing monthly. This demand requires more copper production to meet the needs of all countries. It is estimated that the average fossil-fuel car requires about 20 kg of copper, whereas an average electric vehicle requires double that amount or even more. Silver also presents itself as a favorable commodity for Peru as the United States expects higher demand for physical silver. This correlates directly to demand for gold, which also increases in response to higher silver demand. 

As we are almost accustomed to remote working and virtual meetings, the need for better work management and better communication is required more than ever. These needs, along with a strong comeback of the mining industry in Peru, will require a significant amount of organization to cope with the fast-paced work environment. This leads to the need for powerful software, able to flawlessly manage mining designs, plans, and other information in one secure location that can be accessed easily by an organization. Promine addresses these needs through the Essential Category, which allows users to share up-to-date drawings using the Filer Module. In addition, this project management tool allows you to connect to a local server, OneDrive or Google Drive, and add unlimited users to your account for managing drawing-level permissions. This invaluable toolkit allows organizations to easily manage their teams during the fast-moving recovery period of the mining industry. 

 

 

References: 

GBR – Peru Mining 2021 Pre-Release. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.gbreports.com/publication/peru-mining-2021-pre-release 

Mining – Peru – For Australian exporters. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.austrade.gov.au/australian/export/export-markets/countries/peru/industries/mining